Yet Another Piercing Drama

In October 2014 I wrote about a piercing drama when I lost my clitoris hood piercings. Today I want to tell you about a different kind of piercing drama. Ever since my inner labia were pierced for the second time, I wanted the standard piercings to be replaced. I can’t believe I waited almost three years to do this! It felt like yesterday that I got those piercings. To my defense I can say that we went back to the store twice in 2013 and both those times they said the piercings were not healed well enough yet to have them changed.

Anyhow, on 13 August 2015, the day we met @Baby_Girl_66_, I finally went back to the piercing shop to have those piercings changed. I wanted all of my piercings changed to gold. I thought that the first two inner labia rings were all gold too, but I was mistaken. No, I didn’t check before we went to the store. So at the store I chose three gold-colored piercings – one with a nice bright star on it for my clitoral hood piercing and two for the second set of inner labia piercings. It was only at home when I made a photo that I realized that the first set of inner labia rings were different. I had plans to go back to the store the next weekend to replace those two rings too.

On the Friday of that weekend we had an intense sex session. I was intensely horny and had 33 orgasms (yes, Master T made me count them). My pussy was sore afterwards and still sore the next day. When on the Sunday I had a slight itch, I thought it was still because of the rough sex we had. When the itch was still there on Monday, I took medicine to stop a yeast infection, as I thought the rough sex might have sparked something. On Tuesday I took more meds and on Wednesday it felt better, so this was confirmation to me that it was indeed a yeast infection and that the meds were doing what they should do. On Thursday the itch was back and then a thought struck me. Could it be the new piercings?

The next day, this past Friday, the itch was terrible. I contacted the piercing shop and asked them what to do. They advised me to go to the store so they could check it. As I had to work, I could only go the next day, this past Saturday. But, I started searching the Internet and learned that the piercings were gold-plated (this I knew) and that under the gold is surgical steel. What I didn’t know is that surgical steel was made of a combination of chromium, molybdenum and nickel. When I saw ‘nickel’ I instantly knew what the problem was, as way back when I got my first day collar, I also got a rash from the silver decorations around the string that held the central ring. To stop the rash, I used one or two covers of clear nail polish until I got my new day collar. But, I could hardly treat the piercings between my legs with nail polish, right?

At the piercing shop, the moment I spread my legs, she saw it. My inner labia were red and irritated and swollen. She carefully changed the piercings to titanium rings with a gold ball on them. So now both inner labia sets had the same rings in them. Thankfully the clitoral hood piercing is okay, so no need to put a standard ring in there. Directly after the rings were changed the itching seemed to be gone, but it was back later the afternoon. Thankfully on Sunday I could feel a huge improvement. If not, I would’ve been back at the piercing shop in a flash!

 

20150829-006wm piercings
If you look at the bottom piercing on the left, you see that it’s nice and totally golden. Look at the two bottom rings on the right and you see that the surgical steel is already showing as the gold plating disappeared. The lady at the piercing shop said this was not supposed to happen this quickly, so I guess this must have been a bad batch, or getting in contact with the other piercings ‘damaged’ the new rings. You can also see that the ring with the gold star is still perfectly golden, although I will keep a close watch on this…
(click to enlarge)

 

Nickel allergy
Nickel allergy is one of the most common causes of allergic contact dermatitis — an itchy rash that appears when your skin touches a usually harmless substance.

Nickel allergy is commonly associated with earrings and other jewelry, particularly jewelry associated with body piercings. But nickel can be found in many everyday items — from coins to zippers, from cellphones to eyeglass frames.

Nickel allergy can affect people of all ages. A nickel allergy usually develops after repeated or prolonged exposure to items containing nickel. Treatments can reduce the symptoms of nickel allergy. Once you develop nickel allergy, however, you will always be sensitive to the metal and need to avoid contact.
Source: Mayo Clinic 

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